Golf Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Bonjour,

I'm new to golf, and would like some advice on clubs. I notice many people are replacing irons with small hybrid type clubs, and small fairway woods.

Can anyone explain in simple terms what these clubs achieve.

What is a hybrid club, when would you use one, and why are they better than irons.

Clearly a fairway wood is what is says but, I notice some are down to seven size, again what are they for, and why replace the iron.

Would it be possible to use all hybrid/woods and just have them in your bag, and no irons except wedges, and drivers.

I ask because I'm looking to buy my first set of clubs, and would like to get it right.

Thanks,

Ricky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Hi Ricky

Basically the hybrid is supposed to be easier to hit than a normal iron. I had a hybrid driving iron and hated the thing. The idea is that they have a larger sweet spot, so that even with a slight miss-hit you still get a decent flight on the ball.

Id say, go to your local store and try a few of each, see what you like hitting better.

Personally I dont think they are better than irons. If you are looking for beginners irons then check out cavity back irons that are designed for learning with, dont bother looking at blades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Bonjour,

Many thanks for the kind reply. So you got me!! What are cavity backed Irons and what advantage do they have?

Would I have to upgrade at some stage to blades!! Whats the difference between the two please.

Thanks again,

Ricky.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
If you look at the back of an iron, and there is a cut out - thats a cavity backed iron. These are easier to hit, different brands and models are suited to higher and lower handicaps. But these are generally easier to hit than blades.

If when you look at the back of a club, it is solid on the reverse then that is a blade, less forgiveness and harder to hit - these are generally aimed at the lower handicapper, however, there are always exceptions to the rule.

Blades are a long way off if you are just starting. No one says you have to move to blades, its personal choice. Scratch players can play with cavity backs, loads do.

Forget blades for now, go try some good starter cavity backs and see how you get on :)

Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Many Thanks,

That is very good advice, and I understand the reason for it. So if I'm looking to buy a new set in the very near future, are you able to suggest a good make for us.

We like the look of the following. Ping, Titleist and TaylorMade, and if so what would you think a full set should consist of ?

We are thinking of the following makers, because we feel they would offer quality of perfomance, and back up sevice, but we are open to suggestions.

We dont want to be able to blame a bad stroke on poor equipment!

Once again thanks for the time and help given.

Ricky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
You also have, Mizuno :), callaway, cleveland, cobra etc etc there are loads of great makes available.

They will all make great clubs, but there are different models for each manufacturer. When you are looking, make sure that you look for specifically designed beginners clubs.

I would reccomend that you buy a golf magazine - golf monthly or something like that as they usually reveiw irons and tell you what ones are good for beginners, intermediate, and expert players.

Ricky said:
Many Thanks,

That is very good advice, and I understand the reason for it. So if I'm looking to buy a new set in the very near future, are you able to suggest a good make for us.

We like the look of the following. Ping, Titleist and TaylorMade, and if so what would you think a full set should consist of ?

We are thinking of the following makers, because we feel they would offer quality of perfomance, and back up sevice, but we are open to suggestions.

We dont want to be able to blame a bad stroke on poor equipment!

Once again thanks for the time and help given.

Ricky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Full set of clubs...

Driver (not essential when learning the game)
3 wood (generally the first wood you learn to hit before progressing to a driver)
5 wood (as above)

Irons - 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 and PW

Most manufacturers dont supply a sand iron with their sets any more so you may need to invest in one seperately

Sand Iron

As you progress you will more than likely add another wedge to your bag.

Then putter :)

The above is probably what you would call a standard set up, but people can mix and match as they wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Bonjour,

Once again, thank you for the comprehensive reply. One other question I would ask is, do you think you get better value from the more expensive clubs such as we have mentioned.

The reason I ask is, I also do another sport were value, and at times quality does not always equate to a better product. The like of the companies we have discussed advertise very hard, and it would be easy to think you cannot play a good game unless you have the right 'NAME' in your bag.

Also when you view a product in a magazine, as you have suggested, they hardly ever get a poor review. Could be because they advertise in the same magazine, if you take my meaning?

I would be interested to know of a keen priced product, that also has great quality. In the sport I know, its taken years, and pots of money, to find this out. I hope by this web site I may not make the same mistakes again.

I'm also a little surprised, you are the only person kind enough to offer advice on this subject?

Kind Regards

Ricky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Hi Ricky

Its not always the case that the most expensive club is the best for you, especially when you are learning.

You really need to look at a beginners set to start with. There is absolutely no point in spending £300 on the latest driver, when you wont be able to make the most of it.

If it was me learning I would look at something like a wilson set of irons, and pick up a 3 wood and a putter. Get some lessons and learn the basics of the game, then after a couple of years or so when you feel like you have progressed enough then go and look at the more expensive clubs aimed at intermediates.

There is always the risk that a club will get a good review because they have already spend ££££ in advertising in the same mag. Check out some online sites that review the clubs.

You wouldnt go and buy a ferrari when you had just past your driving test as you wouldnt be able to control the car or get the most out of it. You would learn on something more forgiving and less difficult to control. Same applies with golf clubs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Ricky said:
I ask because I'm looking to buy my first set of clubs, and would like to get it right.
One of the biggest mistakes people make when starting in golf is they want to start rush out and buy a brand new set of shiny and expensive golf clubs. While they are nice to look at you should keep in mind that today's golf equipment comes in great varieties to cater for different golfing types and abilities. Since you're just starting out you do not know which set fits you best. Just imagine the envious looks you get at the driving range when you come with your $2000 set, and the subsequent laughter when you try and just 'hack away' - not worth the embarrassment! Once you spend a few hundred or even thousand $$ on a set that doesn't suit your style you're stuck with it or you have to sell it to somebody else at a loss.

If you feel you want your own clubs get a half set. This generally comprises five irons and perhaps two woods and a putter. Usually the irons are the odd numbers 3,5,7,9 and wedge. These clubs are more than enough to get you started (A good basic descriptions of clubs is provided in our Golf Equipment section.)

A better alternatively: most Driving Ranges will have clubs for rent, so you can try out a few different ones. You can also borrow one or two clubs from a friend. The shortest iron (nine iron) or a wedge are the best clubs to start, practicing with it will give you the feeling of hitting the ball in the air and should be fairly straight forward.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top