Golf Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever tried using refurbished golf balls? They are a lot cheaper, but I don't know if what they do to them, which is apparently described as "processed via one or more of the following steps: stripping, painting, stamping, and/or clear coating". Could any of these processes really impair the performance of the ball?

I've been tempted to try some, but hesitant about performance problems not making it worth the money you save by buying them. I've had pretty good luck with refurbished computer equipment, but I don't know if the same thing would apply to something I have no real idea how it works :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
what's your handicap? if it's high like mine i doubt having $4 golf balls is going to improve your game much at this point and they're mostly going to end up lost in the woods or on the bottom of a water hazard.

I bought 30 'recycled' golf balls for $20 and they work fine for me for now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice, Husker. I don't actually have an official handicap, but if I did it would probably be pretty high too :D

I find I don't have to buy balls too often. I play a lot with the balls that wind up in my front yard from the premium golf course across the road. Have been able to try a lot of different balls that way and they are usually in next-to-perfect shape, since it's such an expensive club to play.

I do think some of the more expensive kind I find seem to improve my game, but that could just be coincidence, too.:dunno:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I prefer new and cheap. Might add that those recycled are not guaranteed by whoever is selling it or refurbishing it... :thumbsdown:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advice, everyone. I think I'll stick with my current supplier - the golf course across the road ;)

I get a good variety of different balls and the vast majority are top of the line too. Most have hardly any wear and tear on them. I think a lot of the golfers on that course use new balls 'cause it's so darn expensive to golf there so they want to ensure their game is going to be as good as it can get. Given that, though, I still can't figure out how so many balls make it to my lawn given that there's a hole close by and another tee. Someone has got to be whacking those balls to try to reach the green pretty hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Save me the NIKEs

CanCaddy said:
Thanks for the advice, everyone. I think I'll stick with my current supplier - the golf course across the road ;)

I get a good variety of different balls and the vast majority are top of the line too. Most have hardly any wear and tear on them. I think a lot of the golfers on that course use new balls 'cause it's so darn expensive to golf there so they want to ensure their game is going to be as good as it can get. Given that, though, I still can't figure out how so many balls make it to my lawn given that there's a hole close by and another tee. Someone has got to be whacking those balls to try to reach the green pretty hard.
Hey dawg,

Listen keep the NIKEs and shoot (all puns intended) them to me....PM me and I'll give you my address. I love refurbed balls....I m about a 14 handicapper and I am not good enough yet for the type of ball I play with affects my game. I love NIKE stuff - balls included cause my favorite golfer plays with them!!!!!!

Holla
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
If you buy large quantities on ebay you can get some cheap used balls that are actually pretty good.
I would look into something like the callaway big bertha I'm sure you could get some pretty good deals with those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
CanCaddy said:
Thanks for the advice, Husker. I don't actually have an official handicap, but if I did it would probably be pretty high too :D

I find I don't have to buy balls too often. I play a lot with the balls that wind up in my front yard from the premium golf course across the road. Have been able to try a lot of different balls that way and they are usually in next-to-perfect shape, since it's such an expensive club to play.

I do think some of the more expensive kind I find seem to improve my game, but that could just be coincidence, too.:dunno:
This is coming from a beginner but I will tell you that there are SO MANY variables with golf from wind speed, grip, lie, swing plane, etc that you need to minimize the number of variables. Ball flights vary depending upon ball types. If you are hitting random balls, you will not be consistent in your play.

Some balls have high spin and some have low spin, some soft and some firm.

For a higher handicapper with a slice, it's better to use a lower spin ball. I have tried numerous Titlelists with little success compared to the lower end Distance Balls with lower spin. I have had success with the Top Flite Straight series, personally.

Another thing I do to maintain consistency is use a tee height of the exact height every time. I use Brush Tees for my Driver and 3 wood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
When i first started golf i did my dad tried to fob me off with refurbished Pro v 1s i hit them quite well even though they are either Top Flights or Donneys underneath them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
My dad found a guy that sells back golf balls from a quarter to $1 depending on the ball..Got a dozen Pro V1x from $12 and a ball from that dozen has my longest drive ever. 342 yards :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
There's lots of places that sell used balls. Are they any good?
The following is a recent reprint from GOLF DIGEST on the pros and cons of the reprocessed golf ball. Or, more precisely, the reprocessed water ball.

Here, my friends, is the $64,000 question. Exactly how much life is left in
those golf balls that have been fished out of the water? The cover of a golf
ball seems fairly impervious, so how bad could it be for a ball to sit idly in the water for a few months? Does a ball that's been lying in the mud at the bottom of a pond for 30 days lose distance? Does it gain distance? Does being submerged for a length of time have any effect whatsoever?

Like most golfers, GOLF DIGEST editors recover their fair share of water balls (that's right, we're as cheap as the next guy), and also like most golfers, we wanted to know what we were getting from these somewhat soggy transactions.

Here's how we went about investigating the playability of balls pulled from the water, and keep in mind that the test was not all-inclusive. We used only three-piece, balata-covered balls and two-piece balls with a lithium-Surlyn cover.

Step 1: (a) We took 11 new three-piece balls and 11 new two-piece balls and submerged them in a pond for eight days.
(b) We took another 22 new two- and three-piece balls and submerged them for three months.
(c)Then we took a third batch of 22 new balls and let them sit in the water for six months. The average water temperatures ranged from 36 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit during this period.


Step 2: We recovered the balls last November and tested them using a robotic hitting machine. The golf club used was a standard-length metal driver (9.5-degree loft) with an extra-stiff shaft. Clubhead speed was 93.7 m.p.h., launch angle was 9 degrees and the average spin rate was 2,800 r.p.m.

Step 3: We started testing by hitting 11 new two- and three-piece balls as a benchmark
The average carry and roll for the new three-piece balls was 250.7 yards. These numbers are not the maximum carry and roll for two-and three-piece balls, simply the average carry and roll under our test conditions.

The next stage was to hit the balls that had been retrieved from the water. The average carry and roll for three-piece balls that had been in the water for eight days was 235.7 yards. That distance shrunk to 229.4 yards after three months and to 226.2 yards after six months. The differences? A six yard loss of distance after eight days, a 12-yard loss after three months and a 15-yard loss after six months.

For the two-piece ball, the carry and roll was 250.7 yards for the new two-piece balls and 244.9 yards after eight days in the water. The carry and roll for two-piece balls after three months in the drink was 241.6 yards. The two-piece balls that spent six months under water averaged 242.5 yards. The bottom line is that the two-piece ball came up almost six yards shorter after being submerged for eight days. It lost another 3.3 yards (9.1 total) after three months, yet interestingly enough, after six months in the water, the two-piece ball averaged one yard farther than the ball that had been in the water for three months.

"Golf balls basically have a non-porous cover," says Mike Sullivan, senior director of research and development worldwide for Spalding, maker of Top-Flite golf balls, "but like with any plastic or polymer, they are subject to chemicals passing through them. We
have looked at this in great detail, because we certainly don't want the balls to be affected one way or the other by humidity or wet fairways.

"For a two-piece ball, being in the water typically makes the ball harder in terms of compression, and it also slows down the coefficient of restitution (the ability of the ball to regain its roundness after impact), and that makes it fly shorter. Three-piece balls are the opposite in that they get softer in terms of compression, but they will also fly shorter. We have no data that says water hurts three-piece balls more than two-piece balls, but soft-cover balls are obviously a bit more permeable than hard-cover balls."

Senior executive vice Vanasdale, president for the golf ball division of Sport Supply Group, says "I can honestly say that we have done tests in the tens of thousands utilizing our environments, and I'll tell you this much, your numbers are off. It's all relative to the types of balls, the makes of balls, when the balls were made and the types of composition of the cover stock," says Vanasdale.

The missing link in this equation is that when you scoop a ball from the water, you never know how long that ball has been sitting there. So, the next time you see a little white orb shimmering in the shallows of a nearby pond, remember the adage, all that glitters is not gold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
jho786 said:
My dad found a guy that sells back golf balls from a quarter to $1 depending on the ball..Got a dozen Pro V1x from $12 and a ball from that dozen has my longest drive ever. 342 yards :D
Yesterday I bought a dozen Pro V1X, and V1 mix, from my course for $5! He said they came off the course, and it looked to me that they were hit only once, and that hit got them lost. I ended up hitting one about 350, and sticking it to the front of the green. One of my best rounds ever! I love Pro Vs!!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top