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Discussion Starter #1
Need info on methods of removing broken (at the hosel) graphite shaft from driver. Can I use a screw extractor and heat the driver head - similar to extracting a broken steel shaft from golf club head? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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try and take it to your local club pro
 

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fsjgolf said:
Thanks for responding guys. I really want to try removing it myself.
I would also very much recommend bringing it to your local pro shop. They specialize in these things and know exactly what to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Shaft Removal

Thanks Guys appreciate you recommendation. Good of you to take the time to reply to my question.

Fsjgolf
 

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gotlabs

similar to what you are doing.
When I don't want to heat a driver head to remove a shaft I just cut if off flush and use it for a 3 or 4 or 5 wood depending on how deeply the shaft seats. some titleist and callaways are bore thru.

then with a sharp drill bits and a cordless drill I play dentist and take out (((slowly))) graphite from the shaft. then use a slightly larger diameter drill. I have one drill bit that in only use for the final clean out/ Never use a drill bit that is going to take any metal out. wear a dust mask.

if it is bore through, I would index the drill so as to not completely drill through the head. leave the tip and plug in the head and insert the new shaft to that point.

go slowly
 

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Normally, if you want to take a graphite shaft out of a clubhead, you would use a heat gun instead of a torch, but since it's broken, you probably aren't concerned about what condition the shaft is in once you get it out. It's already broken, right?

If you try to drill it out, I don't think too many common wood bits will damage the inside of the hosel. I believe the steel in cast clubs is a lot harder than the bit itself.

On the other hand, you can bend a coathanger with a pliers to make a very small hook on the end, then heat the hosel with a torch or the flame from a gas stove and pull the leftover bit of shaft out. You can then use the hanger to push some cloth, definitely not Kleenex, into the hosel and probably wipe out a lot of epoxy residue.

Quite a number of years ago, Ralph Maltby, (spelling?), wrote a comprehensive book on club repair. It's worth it's weight in gold.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Broken Golf Shaft

Thanks fellows. You all gave some great advice regarding this problem. I was able to to use drill bits to slowly and successfully remove the broken shaft. Your help gave me the confidence to complete this project.
 
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