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I don't know why I do this. I can usually hit the ball pretty straight with my irons but not my driver. I think it has something to do with the driver being longer than the irons. Anyone hve any suggestions/drills I can do to fix it? Thanks for any input.
 

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i have this problem too. i figured out i was coming over the top with my driver and it was causing the ball to slice hard.

my three thoughts before i hit off the tee are to keep my hands back, tilt my spine away from the ball and to try and swing up on the ball. i also started choking up on my driver a bit. you lose some distance, but it's helped keep the ball in play.
 

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Hi :)

When you hit your irons, do you cut or fade them at all?

Because the driver has the lowest loft it will exaggerate the spin you are putting on the ball more than a lofted iron would.

If you are hitting the odd fade with irons as well then you will have to take a look at your swing path, set up a camcorder or something behind you to film your swing then check it. Chances are you are hitting the ball with an out to in swing path which is putting the spin on the ball and turning it into a slice.

You can also check, stance, club position - make sure that the club isnt open at address, make sure the ball with your driver is close to your front inside foot.
 

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30over said:
I don't know why I do this. I can usually hit the ball pretty straight with my irons but not my driver. I think it has something to do with the driver being longer than the irons. Anyone hve any suggestions/drills I can do to fix it? Thanks for any input.
http://gzi.mine.nu:65433/golf/troubleshoot.htm

Also, get a higher lofted driver to reduce sidespin.

Use a low spin, low compression ball to reduce sidespin.
 

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Swing Change is the Best Way

Cronic slicing is caused by a faulty swing. Learn about how to swing the club either from lessons or books.

Want it boiled down to a simple tip to try? That might not be possible but you could give this a try:

Backswing: First on your backswing make sure that the weight is on your rear foot (right foot for right handers). Go ahead and move your head laterally back a couple of inches if that is what it takes to get the weight on the right foot. Make your backswing a little shorter than normal.

"Middle Move":Then before you do a forward swing, do this in the middle: Move your hips forward without trying to rotate them. Just move them laterally forward. (It will make your arms lower--this is good--let it happen.)

Downswing: This will initiate your swing so let it just happen from there. (And by the way do not let your head slide forward with the hips...keep it back where it was.)

Try this an post back if it helped.
 

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Make sure you're turning through the ball as well with your upper body. Fully complete the swing so you end up facing your target with your right shoulder. Coming off the ball early will cause fading and in extreme cases, slicing. but that's just one possibility....
 

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30over said:
I don't know why I do this. I can usually hit the ball pretty straight with my irons but not my driver. I think it has something to do with the driver being longer than the irons. Anyone hve any suggestions/drills I can do to fix it? Thanks for any input.
I used to have this same exact problem. I later found out that I wasn't only swinging my driver wrong, I was also swinging my irons wrong too, even though the ball was going straight!! The irons give backspin to help correct hitting the ball off the sweetspot of the club. Let me try to explain.

The irons are lofted more than the woods and drivers are which increases the amount of backspin on the ball. When you swing at the ball with a highly lofted club, such as the 8 or 9 iron, the ball has very little chance of developing a sideways spin, which keeps the ball straight (it has lots of backspin instead). The face of a driver is very flat, so you get virtually no backspin. If you miss the sweetspot of a driver then you will get sideways spin on the ball causing the ball to slice or hook. Hopefully that made sense.

Just keep practicing trying to hit the sweet spot of your club heads and you will get them going straight. Tee the ball up high. I am sorry but I don't know of any specific drill...these other people seemed to cover some of those. Your swing might not be messed up, but you could be making contact with the club in the wrong spot. For me it was a mixture of both. However, if you are pushing or pulling the ball then that means that the club face could be either open or closed.

Sorry if I tried to teach you something that you already knew!
 

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If you can determine that your swing with your irons, then maybe you're trying to force your driver to do too much. If you try to kill it, there's a very likely possibility of coming over the top.
 

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I had this exact same problem and the only thing that helped me was adopting the "Moe Norman" address of dropping back about a foot back behind the ball before starting my backswing and them on the downswing, always keeping my right cheek back, until after I contact the ball.

Those two simple changes straighted me out, as I may only slice once or twice now a round and then it usually is a minor slice. I don't hit it as far, but more than make up for it by not losing so many golf balls and strokes. I went from losing 8-9 balls a round to one or two. I also hit my irons a lot straighter with more solid contact using Moe's method. I picked this up after watching Utube videos of Moe and analyzing his swing and then trying it on my own.

I have only been playing golf now for about two years, and am 58 years old. I started out with regular golf lessons, but they didn't help me with correcting my slice, as I also had a tendancy to swing too hard with the driver and tense up. Moe's swing corrected this problem automatically.

I had to learn to do it on my own with this different address and swing thought. Simply Google "Moe Norman" and you will see what I am talking about. I would try this before buying a new driver.It costs you nothing but time...and it worked best for me of any type of training, videos, or book instructions.
 

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Cutting across the abll

When you slice the ball you have an open clubface at impact which is probably either because your grip is too weak (not turned around enough to the right on the club - see 2 or more knuckles) or because your swing plane is too much out to in - or over the top; or a combination of both. Start my making sure your only connection with the golf club, the golf grip, is sound and per all the instruction that is out there. Then work on your swing path which, for a draw should be in-to-in with a square clubface at impact. I would hazards a guess that your swing is the same for all clubs however, since the driver has very little loft and is longer then the misses are just exacerbated more than with the more lofted clubs.
 
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