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I've always heard that European golf balls are both smaller and heavier than that of American balls. Looking around on the internet, I've found differing facts on the matter. I was wondering if anyone had any info on that. Are there differences in the size or weight of European balls in contrast with American ? Also, if so, do European balls tend to go further when hit ?

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I thought that they were all very similar yuo can get different types of ball that aid is distance, spin.... They all have to conform to some pga rules I thought?
 

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The American ball is 1.68" in diameter. The British ball used to be 1/65" in diameter, but the two governing bodies got together quite a long time ago and standardized the ball at 1.68" for tournament play. I don't know whether anyone still makes a 1.65" ball. It's really something that seems funny, but you can actually see the difference that three one-thousandth of an inch makes. When I lived in Jamaica, we used to play Dunlop 65's and Penfolds in the small size. You could hold one in your hand and feel the difference.
 

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The American ball is 1.68" in diameter. The British ball used to be 1/65" in diameter, but the two governing bodies got together quite a long time ago and standardized the ball at 1.68" for tournament play. I don't know whether anyone still makes a 1.65" ball. It's really something that seems funny, but you can actually see the difference that three one-thousandth of an inch makes. When I lived in Jamaica, we used to play Dunlop 65's and Penfolds in the small size. You could hold one in your hand and feel the difference.
Actually the British ball was 1.62" (1/16" smaller)in diameter, and that was because of so much golf being played on windy links courses.

The British ball weighed the same as golf balls approved for play by the USGA - 1.62 ounces. On weight, the R&A and USGA agreed. But the "British ball" was very slightly smaller in size, with a diameter of 1.62 inches, compared to the USGA minimum of 1.68 inches. The R&A approved the smaller ball when it first appeared, but in the early 1930s the USGA ruled against the smaller ball, sticking with a minimum diameter of 1.68 inches.

But over the years, a desire grew to standardize the rules on golf ball size. In 1974, the R&A outlawed the small ball in British Opens, but it wasn't until 1990 that the R&A adopted the USGA's 1.68-inch minimum diameter rule, relegating the small ball to history.
 

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You're right. I don't know how I didn't catch that before I posted it.

I used to think it was amazing how such a small difference could be so noticeable when you held up two balls next to each other. When I lived in Jamaica, they had the smaller ball. I played the Dunlop 65 or a Penfold ball when the occasionally had them.

Honestly, while the pros might have such fantastic touch that they can feel a difference playing either size ball, I never felt it made a difference to me. The smaller ball might have gone farther against the wind, but it didn't go as far with the wind. In crosswinds, I just couldn't tell.

I guess some of those old small balls would be collector's items now.
 

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Good question!

English Pool and American Pool. What makes them different if anything at all? Well, the fact is that there are in fact a LOT of differences between these two games that touches on virtually every aspect of the game. From the balls, the cues to the tables themselves. This guide will walk you through each aspect that makes both of these games so different, and to help you decide which game suits you the best.
 
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