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Discussion Starter #1
I have been looking into buyiing this club, and when doing a little research I found thi sarticle:

Thomas SightLine Woods
16 degrees, graphite shaft, regular
Length 43-”, Swingweight D2, Overall Weight 332gr
RH / LH

This Thomas Golf wood has the same “SightLine” feature that was used in the Thomas AT-505 irons reviewed by GCR earlier this year. To make this concept work properly, Thomas has created a flattened plane on top of the crown allowing for an extended sighting line that orients accurately towards the target. This aspect gives the head a distinctive, “flat top” look. Most testers took a little bit of time to adjust to the look, but all eventually grew to like it. While the head is sizeable for a 4-wood, it does have a low, compact appearance that sits down behind the ball nicely at address. Overall, this SightLine wood has an attractive, high-quality look to it.

Aside from the unique crown design, the first thing that everyone notices about the SightLine is the very distinctive sound that it makes at impact. When a ball is struck, a metallic-sounding “dink” is made. It is a substantially loud and assertive sound. Some found this to be distracting; others liked it. After testers witnessed consistently good results with the wood, most grew to like the sound. It is appropriate to the hard, solidly metallic feel at impact that the SightLine has.

The SightLine woods are available from Thomas as assembled clubs or in component form. Our test club was assembled at the factory with their standard graphite. This is a fine, mid-range shaft that has always appealed to more than a few of our testers. It is a mid-bend point shaft that weighs 64 grams and has a torque of 3.8 degrees. The mellow feel complements the metallic feel of this head very well. This combination should appeal to a wide range of golfers

As to the alignment feature: Yes, it does work well when a player takes the time to stand behind the ball and find an online, target spot immediately in front of the ball. For those that don’t, the alignment line can act as an alignment reminder - or, since many golfers do not hit perfectly straight down the line with a perfectly square face, it can act as a distraction. Reactions will vary from player to player. Overall, we have seen good, online consistency from the SightLine with a slight tendency to hit left. Whether that is due to the structure of the head, or to the influence of the strong alignment line, we cannot say.


From Thomas Golf.com

The trajectory created by the SightLine 4-wood is much closer to that of a 3-wood than to a 5-wood. Balls launch hot and low with a flat, penetrating trajectory for most testers. Distances have been good for a 4-wood as would be indicated by a 43” shaft with a swingweight of D2. Other true 3-woods hit longer, but few, if any, hit with more consistent ease. Each of our testers has been able to repeatedly produce good results with the SightLine. One tester who plays Cleveland and Callaway woods took immediately to the SightLine. He liked the look and the way it felt. Shots flew straight, strong and long from the first hit on. For him, it behaved as a high-flying 3-wood. Most others hit the SightLine lower.

While the SightLine has worked very, very well for us, it does have a distinctive personality. We cannot say just which golfers will or will not find it appealing. For those that have persistent troubles with accuracy when hitting fairway woods it is a definite must try, however. The multi-cambered sole of the Sightline gives it good functionality from grassy lies and light rough. Though there are no weight inserts in the beveled sole, the ball gets up well. Those looking for a 4-wood that doubles as a trouble wood from heavy rough and tight, hard lies may be happier with Orlimar or Adams styled woods that have flat-bottomed, sole-weighted designs.
 

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So, Marczo, are you gonna get one?

I'm not sure I'd like the metallic sound from this one. Although the review said that once they got used to it, the testers liked it, I don't know if I could get used to that. It would seem out of place to me and I'd probably find it annoying after a while - that is, unless it improved my game more than my annoyance level :)

Do you think the alignment line thing will help your game?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just saw this club the other day at a store. I was tempted to buy it, but it was quite pricy. I took a few practice swings in the isle and it felt pretty good. But I'm not sure if a straight shot is worth $450.99 CDN.
 

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You gotta look at it this way - the loonie is getting closer and closer to par with the USD, so it's a lot less expensive than it used to be, right? :dunno:

Seriously, that is a little pricey. I sometimes hang out and try the really nice clubs out in the store, but I think I'd have to win the lottery to get a great set of clubs based on the price of that one. Still, a straight shot that is consistently straight could pay off in the long run in the number of good shots I'd make compared to now. Maybe a good Christmas present??
 
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