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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Not really much if you ask me, which means I'm about to show my age.

For a few years now, heel and toe weighting has been "the thing"... but I remember in 1972 when I worked in a proshop, there was a set of Titleist irons with tungsten inserts at the heel and toe. Their advertising talked about the same wider sweet spot that current club makers talk about today.

At the same time, I owned a set of MacGregor woods with brass inserts at the heel and toe. I still have them in the garage, oddly enough.

Since the early 60's, H&B in Louisville, Ky. made a line of irons with cavity backs and perimeter weighting.

Since the middle 70's, Toney Penna made a persimmon driver with a slightly oversized head. I still have that one too... (Are you getting the impression I'm a pack rat?)

Now, we are all excited about hybrid clubs. (I am, they certainly help my game!) Look at the shape of the old clubs from the 1500's... Did they know something we didn't know until recently? Every time I pull one out, I think I'm playing kolven.

And by the way, I've had a 60 degree lob wedge made by Hunter since about 1974.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I seem to have scared everybody off.

Worse yet, could I be so RIGHT that there's nothing else to say? My wife would be terrified to know I was right about something.
 

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The only thing that I can say I have noticed as a new thing is the wider choice of shafts you can now purchase.

It has not been particularly long since you ordered a club and it came with stock shaft, and thats it, regular, stiff, etc.

There is a hell of a lot more variety out there now.
 

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The number one golf equipment improvement in my opinion has been the golf ball. I'm sure you remember the days of the old golf balls DOT, Maxfli Red, ETC. More often than not if you hit just one bad shot they would crack or slice (refered to as a smile). I recall way back when my brothers & I use to go golf ball hunting at the Country Club the real treat was finding a "Faultless" golf ball that made claims never to crack. It was the ball of choice for us youngsters. Only problem with the ball is it truly played like a rock and eventually it would begin to chip apart.

Looking back maybe loving the Lee Trevino Faultless Golf Ball is the reason why I still don't mind hitting Top Flite extra distance ball when I find one!
 
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