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I love my irons that i have had for years and dont want to change them, but as they are getting older I have noticed that the grooves are getting a bit worn and I'm not getting as much check on the ball as I used to.

I remember someone having a groove cutting tool years ago but cant seem to find one anywhere. are they still available and if so where can I buy one?
 

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I'm not sure about buying your own regrooving tool, but most manufactures will do it for you for a small fee. The downside of this is your might have to take a week off golf while their being worked on. :dunno:
 

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If you don't get too carried away, you can probably accomplish the same thing with a Dremel tool and a couple of their fine or extra fine grinding wheels. I use the Dremel and WD40 to clean my clubs (wire wheels) at the end of the season, you just got to keep the revs down or you'll go through wheels like their going out of style. Just a suggestion....
 

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65nlovenit said:
If you don't get too carried away, you can probably accomplish the same thing with a Dremel tool and a couple of their fine or extra fine grinding wheels. I use the Dremel and WD40 to clean my clubs (wire wheels) at the end of the season, you just got to keep the revs down or you'll go through wheels like their going out of style. Just a suggestion....
What wheels fit into the grooves??? I tried that last night, and my grinding wheel wouldn't even fit down in it! What were you useing??
 

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I dont know exactly what the thickness of the cut off wheel is but it can't be more the 1/16 of an inch thick, and your absolutely correct about being square to the groove, also slow the revs down or it will get away from you, use this method as a last resort especially with NEW clubs.
 

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.



Uhh...


not to be a party pooper or anything, but before you guys take a grinder to your golf clubs, I just wanted to know if you all are aware of the fact that grooves have nothing to do with spin.


You DO know that, right?




-JP
 

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JPStuff, there seems to be conflicting information about this subject..
Another important design element of wedge is groove design. Grooves are the horizontal lines that run across the face of a golf club. The purpose of grooves is to channel away moisture and debris at contact to ensure maximum surface area contact between the ball and clubface, ensuring consistency and accuracy. There are two main types of groove design, V and U grooves. V grooves, commonly found in Titleist wedges, do not spin the ball as much as U grooves. U grooves, found in Cleveland and Taylormade wedges, maximize spin as the grooves are deeper and squarer, and “bite” into the ball more. Currently, Taylormade wedge faces and grooves are CNC-milled and ensure the most consistent and highest rates of spin for retail wedges.
 

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You guys are aware that using a dremel tool on your grooves will make your irons illegal.
Why? Because the grooves would not pass the USGA, R&A rules for depth and width.

Now after saying that let me tell you this. I used a dremel to cut some wider grooves on an old GW I had here. Hit balls with it and there was no difference in spin from before and after.

You would have to golf a lot of rounds of golf before you wore out the grooves in your irons. Take it from a guy who golfs a lot of rounds of golf! Over 400 rounds on a set of TaylorMade irons and the grooves were just fine when I traded them in.
 

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Gonna have to agree with you GolfBum, I've got a set of clubs in the garage that are almost 20 years old and the grooves are still fine. BUT.... there are people who hit other things then golf balls, such as trees, rocks, golf carts.. has a tendency to wear the grooves a little faster....:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

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i don't mind using worn grooves so much on my irons since i burn in the faces of my wedges quickly though i like to replace those often, usually every year or two
 

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regrooving your own irons without refinishing them completely will lead to rust in the grooves.. which could/will lead to worse dammage over time. am i wrong ??? if your planning on keeping them around for a while put some money into having them completely restored. or buy the same irons new and sell those.i just dont want to see you end up with rusty iron faces after your clubs sit for a few months in the winter
 
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